Groo's Wanderings

laughterkey:

powells:

Employees spent 8 hrs overnight filling shelves in the newly remodeled rooms. Here they are resting this morning. 

OVERNIGHTS!

POWELLS!

laughterkey:

powells:

Employees spent 8 hrs overnight filling shelves in the newly remodeled rooms. Here they are resting this morning. 

OVERNIGHTS!

POWELLS!

1 August 2014 reblog: powells


wilwheaton:

liartownusa:

US Weekly No.1: Time to Look at More Assholes

Proper source on the image I posted earlier. Thanks to @larrymac808 for the info!

wilwheaton:

liartownusa:

US Weekly No.1: Time to Look at More Assholes

Proper source on the image I posted earlier. Thanks to @larrymac808 for the info!

1 August 2014 reblog: liartownusa


thefrogman:

Ordinary Batman Adventures by Sarah Johnson[website | tumblr | store]

thefrogman:

Ordinary Batman Adventures by Sarah Johnson
[
website | tumblr | store]

1 August 2014 reblog: sarahj-art


1 August 2014 reblog: vanityfair


thelifeguardlibrarian:

Well that’s true. Walkyourcity.org huh.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Well that’s true. Walkyourcity.org huh.

(via laughterkey)

1 August 2014 reblog: thelifeguardlibrarian


micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.
How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 
Something’s very wrong with this picture.
What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.

How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 

Something’s very wrong with this picture.

What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom

(via laughterkey)

1 August 2014 reblog: micdotcom


Hawkeye’s hearing, or How to use signs in storytelling

jkottke:

Hi, everybody! Tim Carmody here, guest-hosting for Jason this week.

In the Marvel comic Hawkeye #15, published in February, the title character was brutally attacked and deafened by a supervillain real estate developer trying to push the hero’s neighbors out of their apartment building in Brooklyn’s Bed-Stuy. (It’s a very special comic book.) This week’s issue, #19, took months to finish but finally picks up that story line. It’s mostly told in a combination of silent panels, American Sign Language, and half-intelligible lip reading. It’s already being talked about as a shoo-in for this year’s Eisner award for best single issue.

clint-600x287.jpg

There are precedents here. Last year’s mostly-silent Hawkeye #11 was told from the point of view of a dog (named Pizza Dog), using symbols and maps to tell a kind of detective story. (That issue also won writer Matt Fraction and artist David Aja the Eisner.)

Pizza dog.png

There’s also a silent issue of Daredevil by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev where the blind superhero is temporarily deafened by an explosion. And there’s two gorgeous mini-arcs of Daredevil by writer/artist David Mack, featuring Maya Lopez as Echo, Daredevil’s deaf, super-powered love interest and counterpart.

Echo.png

Hawkeye’s also been temporarily deaf twice before: once in the limited series Hawkeye, back in the 1980s (his use of a hearing aid made him a minor hero to hearing-impaired readers) and (it’s revealed in this new issue) also as a child, as a result of an injury implied to be caused by his abusive father. This is how Clint and his brother Barney are shown to know American Sign Language.

I’ve been interested in ASL for a long time for personal reasons, but also as a kind of “writing,” in the family-resemblance sense of visible language, that functions like speech.

Comic books, at least in print, are a silent medium by necessity. But it’s still harder to render ASL in comics than ordinary oral/aural speech, because it’s a language of movement, and we don’t have the conventions of speech bubbles and the alphabet.

What we do have is a graphic tradition of maps, signs, atlases, manuals, and other forms of everyday iconography to draw on. And those are largely what Mack used in Daredevil, and what Aja uses in Hawkeye.

It’s a sign that we, all of us, read signs everywhere, and every kind of reading can be used and incorporated in every other kind. The best way to stay true to what’s essential in a medium is to do your best to explode your way out of it.

(via laughterkey)

31 July 2014 reblog: jkottke


alvxandra:

image

i’ve never seen something so accurate

(via nightowlroasters)

31 July 2014 reblog: alvxandra


catsbeaversandducks:

"Today, the dog. Tomorrow, the world!"

Photos found on Pinterest

(via laughterkey)

31 July 2014 reblog: catsbeaversandducks


31 July 2014 reblog: surprise-adoption